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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I ran out of wooden eggs so decided that when I pulled and egg I would vigorously shake it, draw a black line around it and use it again in a couple of days.

Needless to say once you see the photos you will know this doesn't work:eek:

After seeing these two I ordered another dozen wooden eggs!:eek:

The big guy has small German Modenas for parents and the smaller guy, who looks to be a German Modena baby has a large Modena father and a small German momma, as you can tell it really didn't matter who got what egg because they WEREN"T suppose to hatch!:(

Gotta love babies though!:D
 

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omg...what a surprise....I think I will buy some more too...one of my ybs laid her first egg yesterday...and I don't think I have enough wooden ones to go around when the rest start....good to know.....it is funny though....lol...:)..and cute I might add.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Very CUTE babies!

Robin I was just wondering...Do you keep the oops babies or eventually try to adopt them out?
-Hilly

Hi Hilly, I haven't really thought about it, still kicking myself about these 2.:)

I guess I would consider adopting them out, I've never done that before all the animals come here to stay.:D
 

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congrats looks like fate overpowered you this time. i had a thought instead of shaking the eggs why not freeze them???
 

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I had a friend who put dove eggs in the refrigerator for 5 days then put them back under the doves ..... got one baby from the eggs. Shaking and refrigerator does not always work ... better to boil the eggs or use fake eggs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I had a friend who put dove eggs in the refrigerator for 5 days then put them back under the doves ..... got one baby from the eggs. Shaking and refrigerator does not always work ... better to boil the eggs or use fake eggs.

You are so right! little bird:D:D I named the baby Hugo and weighed him today... he weighed in at 224 grams. and still growing.:eek:
 

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OH MY!
Nature is persistant!
I have never used (reused) natural eggs. I just don't think it's right.
I check every day, and night, and control the population, If I think that a female is in any kind of trouble, the pair gets more feed and calcium.
Of course, I only have 6 pigeons, and I haven't had any problems in years.
I think that environment has a lot to do with it. No Smog up here.
For my 6, I supply double the ammount of air space, per pigeon in their loft.
I go with 12 Cubic Ft. of Air Space, Per Pigeon in the loft.
I'm sure that it helps with their well being.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OH MY!
Nature is persistant!
I have never used (reused) natural eggs. I just don't think it's right.
I check every day, and night, and control the population, If I think that a female is in any kind of trouble, the pair gets more feed and calcium.
Of course, I only have 6 pigeons, and I haven't had any problems in years.
I think that environment has a lot to do with it. No Smog up here.
For my 6, I supply double the ammount of air space, per pigeon in their loft.
I go with 12 Cubic Ft. of Air Space, Per Pigeon in the loft.
I'm sure that it helps with their well being.


ND Cooper, the only reason I did re use the eggs was because I needed something fast to replace the eggs that were laid, the 12 wooden eggs that I had were in use, I shook them and felt that they would no longer be viable... I was wrong. I have bought another 12 wooden eggs.

As for your other comments about how you care for your pigeons, it sounds like you take good care of them. I too practice population control hence the 'OOPPS BABIES'. So far knock on wood I have never had a female in trouble, I check on my pigeons 3-4 times aday, the pijs get the best feed, vits. & other supplements. They live in a clean loft that has plenty of fresh air and have access to a very large wire enclosed flight.
You have 6 pigeons, I care for 41 pigeons and doves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OH MY!
Nature is persistant!
I have never used (reused) natural eggs. I just don't think it's right.
I check every day, and night, and control the population, If I think that a female is in any kind of trouble, the pair gets more feed and calcium.
Of course, I only have 6 pigeons, and I haven't had any problems in years.
I think that environment has a lot to do with it. No Smog up here.
For my 6, I supply double the ammount of air space, per pigeon in their loft.
I go with 12 Cubic Ft. of Air Space, Per Pigeon in the loft.
I'm sure that it helps with their well being.

Also I don't understand your above comment, you sound as though you think I'm not taking care of these pigeons. I feel as though you are judging me just because I had unplanned babies and reuse eggs.
 

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Robin,

Cute babies!

I replaced an egg which my wife had removed the previous day. I researched on the internet and determined that it was still viable, and took away the wooden egg my wife had replaced it with. A re-habber said she had room for the pigeon pair and any babies they might have.

I didn't feel quite "right" about it, though, because I wasn't sure if anything might have penetrated the shell during handling. (The nest was in the atelier, where my wife painted and also cleaned brushes, etc.). I should have marked the egg, but it didn't occur to me then.

One of the babies died a day or so after birth. The other one made it to adulthood.

The eggshell is porous, permeable for gas exchange during development. I thought if one egg were dead but the other one viable, the contents of the dead egg might give off noxious gases, and encourage bacteria which might be detrimental to the other egg or chick. None of us likes the smell of rotting eggs (hydrogen sulfide, one of the gases, is extremely poisonous. One lung-full will cause hemorrhage and immediate death.

I remember reading in a Texas Monthly magazine from the 1970's about medical examiners and insurance investigators determining unusual causes of highway deaths. One example was that of drivers who had gone off the highway (two-lane black-tops in Texas) on the wrong side and perished. AT first it seemed they had fallen asleep at the wheel, thus were obviously to blame. It developed that often they were being approached by an oncoming car in their lane. The driver of the other car was asleep or drunk. The first driver would go onto the left side of the highway, in order to avoid the drunk yet still stay on the road. The drunk (or dozer) would realize his mistake at the last minute, get back into his lane, and the first driver would swerve to the left even more and go off the road. Sometimes the drunk was not even aware that he had caused an accident. Another example, pertinent to this post, was that of a pick-up truck that had gone off the road; driver and passenger perished untouched. They had come over a rise into a low desert valley, where a gas pool of heavier-than-air hydrogen sulfide had accumulated due to a malfunctioning oil pump valve (from an oil field pumping station). They died almost instantly, if I remember correctly.

So, my concern was that I might have a chick which managed to survive, but unnecessarily handicapped or disabled, and it might be possible that I would not even be aware of a minor yet existing problem.

So, when someone says it doesn't seem "natural" or "right," I try to question my degree of human intervention, whether it is necessary, harmful, or undesirable.

One question I have for myself: I rescued a pigeon with a broken wing (Rosie). Wing was eventually amputated. I was told the break was compound, so I don't feel too bad about the final outcome, but my question to myself is, if I see a pigeon with a wing hanging down, probably broken, how much additional harm will I cause in the capture or the attempt to capture? Would the pigeon heal on its own, quicker without intervention? I feel certain that in almost any case like this, the wing will be worse off after the capture than it was before the capture. Any interference on my part is certainly "unnatural," until we get philosophical to the point where nothing can be pinned down as being either natural or unnatural, where words lose their meanings.

"I think, therefore I stink."

Larry
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Robin,

I replaced an egg which my wife had removed the previous day. I researched on the internet and determined that it was still viable, and took away the wooden egg my wife had replaced it with. A re-habber said she had room for the pigeon pair and any babies they might have.

I didn't feel quite "right" about it, though, because I wasn't sure if anything might have penetrated the shell during handling. (The nest was in the atelier, where my wife painted and also cleaned brushes, etc.). I should have marked the egg, but it didn't occur to me then.

One of the babies died a day or so after birth. The other one made it to adulthood.

The eggshell is porous, permeable for gas exchange during development. I thought if one egg were dead but the other one viable, the contents of the dead egg might give off noxious gases, and encourage bacteria which might be detrimental to the other egg or chick. None of us likes the smell of rotting eggs (hydrogen sulfide, one of the gases, is extremely poisonous. One lung-full will cause hemorrhage and immediate death.

I remember reading in a Texas Monthly magazine from the 1970's about medical examiners and insurance investigators determining unusual causes of highway deaths. One example was that of drivers who had gone off the highway (two-lane black-tops in Texas) on the wrong side and perished. AT first it seemed they were obviously to blame. It developed that often they were being approached by an oncoming car in their lane. The driver of the other car was asleep or drunk. The first driver would go onto the left side of the highway, in order to avoid the drunk yet still stay on the road. The drunk would realize his mistake at the last minute, get back into his lane, and the first driver would swerve to the left even more and go off the road. Sometimes the drunk was not even aware that he had caused an accident. another example, pertinent to this post, was that of a pick-up truck which had gone off the road, driver and passenger perished untouched. They had come over a rise into a low desert valley, where a gas pool of heavier-than-air hydrogen sulfide had accumulated due to a malfunctioning oil pump valve (from an oil field pumping station). They died almost instantly, if I remember correctly.

So, my concern was that I might have a chick which managed to survive, but unnecessarily handicapped or disabled, and it might be possible that I would not even be aware of a minor yet existing problem.

So, when someone says it doesn't seem "natural" or "right," I try to question my degree of human intervention, whether it is necessary, harmful, or undesirable.

One question I have for myself: I rescued a pigeon with a broken wing (Rosie). Wing was eventually amputated. I was told the break was compound, so I don' feel to bad about the final outcome, but my question to myself is, if I see a pigeon with a wing hanging down, probably broken, how much additional harm will I cause in the capture or the attempt to capture? Would the pigeon heal on its own, quicker without intervention? I feel certain that in almost any case like this, the wing will be worse off after the capture than it was before the capture. Any interference on my part is certainly "unnatural," until we get philosophical to the point where nothing can be pinned down as being either natural or unnatural, where words lose their meanings.

"I think, therefore I stink."

Larry
I think that some have not read or have neglected to understand that I DID NOT REPLACE AN EGG WITH AN EGG THAT I HAD PULLED DAYS BEFORE AND HAD MARKED AND SHAKEN HOPING THAT IT WOULD HATCH.
I used to breed parrots and snakes so I do know about eggs and their structure.
Maybe its just me but I feel as though I am getting a lecture, which I really don't need.:mad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Regrets in starting this thread!

I only started this thread to share what I thought would not happen, an egg that I had removed for at least 4 days before, had shaken and marked then decided to use BECAUSE I ran out of dummy eggs, hatched.

I was warning those who might've thought to try this not to.
 
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