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The chick will take themself out of the nest when ready or the parents will boot the chick out when it's time.
 

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At what age should a chick be taken out the nest and placed on the loft floor?
That depends. How cold is the floor? How many other babies are there? How will the other cocks react?
I personally start putting my babies in the floor at 18 days old, IF it's not TOO cold and IF I have quite a few babies. And then I stand outside the door and watch them for a while to make sure no cock bird is going to bother them. If all seems ok, then I'll leave them but always go out after a few hours and pick them all up and put them back in their boxes.
Now some will say they just put them in the floor and leave them there after a certain age. To each his own. I raise my babies in Jan, Feb and March and it's WAY to cold to leave them in the floor all night.
That's the way I do things.
 

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That depends. How cold is the floor? How many other babies are there? How will the other cocks react?
I personally start putting my babies in the floor at 18 days old, IF it's not TOO cold and IF I have quite a few babies. And then I stand outside the door and watch them for a while to make sure no cock bird is going to bother them. If all seems ok, then I'll leave them but always go out after a few hours and pick them all up and put them back in their boxes.
Now some will say they just put them in the floor and leave them there after a certain age. To each his own. I raise my babies in Jan, Feb and March and it's WAY to cold to leave them in the floor all night.
That's the way I do things.
Really? How come...just curious? I never would have dreamed. Mine have just always seemed to do what they need to do when it's time.:)
 

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Really? How come...just curious? I never would have dreamed. Mine have just always seemed to do what they need to do when it's time.:)
Well, you're in a different situation than I am. First of all, we racers, usually wean our babies at about 27 to 30 days old.
For the birds that I have in my individual breeding pens......I start sitting the nest bowl and everything down in the floor when they are about 2 weeks old, if it's not too cold. Since it's only the parents and the two babies, they start climbing out of the bowl at about 16 days old and moving around on the floor. I don't have to worry one bit about whether those guys know how to eat and drink when I move them.
For the birds in the breeding loft, I usually build a big pile of pine needles and set all the babies in the floor. They'll all pile up with each other and the cock birds will come down and feed the babies. Some cocks will feed any baby that will let him. I've got a couple like that. It's pretty funny to watch. They just go from baby to baby, no matter who's baby it is, feeding them.
If they are stuck in the boxes, they learn to eat, because I keep a bowl of food in the box, but they don't learn how to drink. While I have them in the floor, I set a couple of extra waterers in the floor plus bowls of food (these are what they recognize) and the feed trough. By the time I move them to the YB loft, they pretty much recognize the water and the food. Just make it's easier to wean them.
Now, like I said, if it's really cold out, I don't do all this. I may have some birds that only spend a few days in the floor, but for the most part, the last 10 days they are with the parents they are in the floor learning.

Later.........it's AI night..........
 

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Well, you're in a different situation than I am. First of all, we racers, usually wean our babies at about 27 to 30 days old.
For the birds that I have in my individual breeding pens......I start sitting the nest bowl and everything down in the floor when they are about 2 weeks old, if it's not too cold. Since it's only the parents and the two babies, they start climbing out of the bowl at about 16 days old and moving around on the floor. I don't have to worry one bit about whether those guys know how to eat and drink when I move them.
For the birds in the breeding loft, I usually build a big pile of pine needles and set all the babies in the floor. They'll all pile up with each other and the cock birds will come down and feed the babies. Some cocks will feed any baby that will let him. I've got a couple like that. It's pretty funny to watch. They just go from baby to baby, no matter who's baby it is, feeding them.
If they are stuck in the boxes, they learn to eat, because I keep a bowl of food in the box, but they don't learn how to drink. While I have them in the floor, I set a couple of extra waterers in the floor plus bowls of food (these are what they recognize) and the feed trough. By the time I move them to the YB loft, they pretty much recognize the water and the food. Just make it's easier to wean them.
Now, like I said, if it's really cold out, I don't do all this. I may have some birds that only spend a few days in the floor, but for the most part, the last 10 days they are with the parents they are in the floor learning.

Later.........it's AI night..........
Interesting. Thanks for telling me. Enjoy AI and not a peep out of you about it until I've had a chance to watch it in my time zone.:D
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As for it being cold, I'm in South Florida and its never cold.....

I have babies (different ages) in the nest boxes and was wondering how the best way to wean them was?

Also, Renee, what size are your individual breeding pens/cages?

Thanks
 

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Babies out by 3 weeks is the best, the wean themself faster and the faster they get weaned the better they are. I have also left young till they naturally come out but it became a mess as they become a poop factory after a certain age. Gets poop all over, on there feet, rings etc...
 

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As for it being cold, I'm in South Florida and its never cold.....

I have babies (different ages) in the nest boxes and was wondering how the best way to wean them was?

Also, Renee, what size are your individual breeding pens/cages?

Thanks
My pens are 2 feet wide, 3 feet deep with a 3 foot aviary (so 6 feet all together) and 6 feet high. You can see pictures on my web site.
http://lovebirdsloft.homestead.com/TheLoft.html
 

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At what age should a chick be taken out of the nest and placed on the loft floor?

I don't put mine on the floor, but I take them out when they are walking and feathered. I take my few out in the patio and put food and water out and allow them to interact with any other youngster (which is now an oops baby or two) I have an old playpen they sit in, and they enjoy it. Sometimes they even will bathe in their water!

First I take them out for an hour and then increase it as they mature. The parents usually don't mind if I return them before feeding time.
 

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28 TO 35 days old is right for most all breeds of pigeons. I like 28 to 30 days. Then move them from the nest hole to the young bird loft. At 35 days old They are well ready and can be sure they are eat pretty well. But 28 to 35 days should work for any one.
 

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That's the way I've always done it

The chick will take themself out of the nest when ready or the parents will boot the chick out when it's time.
I have never forced a baby to wean, nor have I ever kicked one out of the nest. I'm not sure why you would but obviously people are doing this.

They will wean themselves when they are ready or their parents have decided to stop feeding them. All we have to do is make sure that their parents didn't stop before the baby could eat on it's own.

I have noticed in my flock of rollers that several young birds over the years would feed other youngsters that were on the floor, begging anyone to feed them. These young feeders were not even old enough to have laid an egg and still did not have their irridescant feathers. I have also read of this foster feeding behavior in other breeders rollers as well.

Has anyone seen other breeds of pigeons exhibiting this type of behavior (foster feeding) ? I don't think that I ever saw any of my show breeds do this or any of my other performing breeds either but it certainly seems to be a trait of Birmingham Rollers,

Bill
 
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