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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
well guys i was working in the field (weed wacking) and i found this little racoon he fell out of the tree so i watched him for about 3 hours from the house and momma did not come down to get her (it's a girl) so i could not bare to have it die so i took it inside and we have it in our home and currently are feeding it cat milk (only thing we could think of and only thing we had it seems to be 3-4 weeks old eyes are mostly open and she is making all of the noises that an adult would make cant realy describe them

does anyone have any helping advise??
 

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Years ago I successfully raised two (male and female) and they were about the age you are describing. I fed them as if they were human babies. Sometimes regular milk (warmed not hot)…other times baby formula every three to four hours. Sometimes…if they don’t want to suckle on the bottle nipple, you may need to force feed, but don’t over feed them (you can tell by feeling their bellies). Keep them warm…inside. Once it gets a little older…feed it dog food (I used the can stuff). They loved boiled eggs. I named them Rascal (male) and Easy (the female because she was so easy to feed). They eventually would follow me around the yard just like puppies. Once they were older (4 to 6 months) I left them a 6’ x 6’ metal cage, more for their safety then anything else.

You must always keep in mind…they are a wild animal. As they got older the male would try to bite me, but not all the time. The only reason I raised them is because a guy I knew was forced to kill the mother (that’s another story). In most areas it is against the law to keep an animal like a raccoon. Some times the law is enforced…some times it isn’t. When they were just about a year old I released them into the wild. And before anyone says…it was wrong to keep a wild animal…I agree…it is, but it was either give them a chance or death in the beginning.
 

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http://www.mnsi.net/~remocoon/babies.htm

You need to take it back to where you found it and watch to see if mom will come and get it. They are nacturnal. This is not a good thing. If you cannot reconnect the baby with the mom, you really do need to turn it over to a wild life rehabber ASAP.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is mookeemans girlfriend. My boyfriend waited hours for mom to come and get it. It was dark when we went and got her. Fear of her being hit by a car or freezing to death was too intense. Mom had no interest and was not even coming out to look. Even though the baby was calling for hours. She is currently being fed catmilk and is adjusting ok. Obviosly shes a bit fussy for it not being her mom shes nursing from. We will not be treating her as a pet as she will be released shortly. I wear gloves while handling her and only handle her to feed her. Hopefully she pulls through and can live a normal life out in the wild. We dont have wildlife rehabilitation in this area. A vet would charge to take it in. Ive nursed a skunk from this age and many other animals. Ive been an animal breeder for years and have had all sorts of things. I am confident she will be fine. Feel free to keep commenting, maybe we will get some pics for you.
 

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This is mookeemans girlfriend. My boyfriend waited hours for mom to come and get it. It was dark when we went and got her. Fear of her being hit by a car or freezing to death was too intense. Mom had no interest and was not even coming out to look. Even though the baby was calling for hours. She is currently being fed catmilk and is adjusting ok. Obviosly shes a bit fussy for it not being her mom shes nursing from. We will not be treating her as a pet as she will be released shortly. I wear gloves while handling her and only handle her to feed her. Hopefully she pulls through and can live a normal life out in the wild. We dont have wildlife rehabilitation in this area. A vet would charge to take it in. Ive nursed a skunk from this age and many other animals. Ive been an animal breeder for years and have had all sorts of things. I am confident she will be fine. Feel free to keep commenting, maybe we will get some pics for you.
Raccoons spend a year or more with their mom, who teaches them how to find food and survive in the wild. That's something you can't do. The baby need to be rehabbed with other Raccoons so she will be able to survive. The point is this...if you release her after she is weaned, without learning survival skills, she is doomed.
 

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This is mookeemans girlfriend. My boyfriend waited hours for mom to come and get it. It was dark when we went and got her. Fear of her being hit by a car or freezing to death was too intense. Mom had no interest and was not even coming out to look. Even though the baby was calling for hours. She is currently being fed catmilk and is adjusting ok. Obviosly shes a bit fussy for it not being her mom shes nursing from. We will not be treating her as a pet as she will be released shortly. I wear gloves while handling her and only handle her to feed her. Hopefully she pulls through and can live a normal life out in the wild. We dont have wildlife rehabilitation in this area. A vet would charge to take it in. Ive nursed a skunk from this age and many other animals. Ive been an animal breeder for years and have had all sorts of things. I am confident she will be fine. Feel free to keep commenting, maybe we will get some pics for you.
my sister has raised several racoons, the problem is when they are released, like Charis said...the ones my sister released were not afraid of houses and searched for food around residences...mine in particular, they got in to everthing searching because they did not know how to go out and look for those crawfish and bugs and berries and things, so we had to relocate them far from houses and near water as they like to be near water, but I think they would of been better off if they had some wild ones to learn from....perhaps that is why the wildlife rehab would be better...and they (the people) are vaccinated against rabies too.
 

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This is mookeemans girlfriend. My boyfriend waited hours for mom to come and get it. It was dark when we went and got her. Fear of her being hit by a car or freezing to death was too intense. Mom had no interest and was not even coming out to look. Even though the baby was calling for hours. She is currently being fed catmilk and is adjusting ok. Obviosly shes a bit fussy for it not being her mom shes nursing from. We will not be treating her as a pet as she will be released shortly. I wear gloves while handling her and only handle her to feed her. Hopefully she pulls through and can live a normal life out in the wild. We dont have wildlife rehabilitation in this area. A vet would charge to take it in. Ive nursed a skunk from this age and many other animals. Ive been an animal breeder for years and have had all sorts of things. I am confident she will be fine. Feel free to keep commenting, maybe we will get some pics for you.
I don't doubt your ability to feed this little girl (they are usually bottle fed Esbilac), but Charis and Spirit wings are absolutely right. Raccoons are different than skunks and squirrels. They need to be with other raccoons before release so they can learn to survive in the wild.
When I get very young ones, I get them started and stabilized. I then take it to a rehab/sanctuary 3 hours away from me on the NH/Vermont border. The baby raccoons are raised together outside in a very large enclosure away from her house. They are not released until they are about 6-8 months old, and then for the first year feeding stations are set out for them to ensure their survival - away from homes! As adorable and cute as they are, if you take their fear of humans away from them - they are doomed.
Also, alot of rehabbers won't take raccoons (and skunks) because of the rabies hysteria :rolleyes: and they are euthanized. :mad:
So if you really care about this little girls survival, you will find a rehabber (that will take raccoons), even if you have to travel a bit.
 

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I personally think that the best thing to do for this cute little **** is to find a local rehabilitation center for it where it colud find a seregant mother, and get better shot at a free life. Surf the web for a rehaber, im sure there is one near you!;)

But I'm glad you know this is NOT a pet! :)

And tanks for helping her.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
ok look in the last few days i have been looking and calling
most people said they do not deal with raccoons they are just a nuissence and just a big vermon and to just kill it and let it die so look we are trying to save this **** so there is nothing i can say except thank you all for your advice but i want to know what to feed it as it gets older and how old till i can relese it? i dont need anymore ppl sayingtake it to a rehabitor becaue they will not help me
 

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ok look in the last few days i have been looking and calling
most people said they do not deal with raccoons they are just a nuissence and just a big vermon and to just kill it and let it die so look we are trying to save this **** so there is nothing i can say except thank you all for your advice but i want to know what to feed it as it gets older and how old till i can relese it? i dont need anymore ppl sayingtake it to a rehabitor becaue they will not help me
Did you read the link I provided? It has all the basic info there.
 

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ok look in the last few days i have been looking and calling
most people said they do not deal with raccoons they are just a nuissence and just a big vermon and to just kill it and let it die so look we are trying to save this **** so there is nothing i can say except thank you all for your advice but i want to know what to feed it as it gets older and how old till i can relese it? i dont need anymore ppl sayingtake it to a rehabitor becaue they will not help me
When you call the rehabbers and when they say they don't treat Pigeons, ask them for a referral and then follow the trail. Eventually, you will find someone. Don't give up.
 

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You are correct Terry, there is no treatmentt and it is fatal.
Pyrantil and piperazine will kill the adult Baylisascaris. But it will not repair the damage done by migrating larvae. But, baby raccoons are not old enough to have migrating larvae yet, so your usually safe if you worm immediately with pyrantil (strongid).
 

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Pyrantil and piperazine will kill the adult Baylisascaris. But it will not repair the damage done by migrating larvae. But, baby raccoons are not old enough to have migrating larvae yet, so your usually safe if you worm immediately with pyrantil (strongid).
I read an article from Mickaboo [sp] in the SF area. Over the past several years they have been receiving wild Parrots that live in SF, displaying neurological symptoms that have been caused by the Raccoon round worm. The sad thing that I remember form the articel I read is that the Parrots could not be released because there was no cure for the worms they were infested with. I'm glad that is incorrect. I'm glad there is a wormer that works.
 

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I read an article from Mickaboo [sp] in the SF area. Over the past several years they have been receiving wild Parrots that live in SF, displaying neurological symptoms that have been caused by the Raccoon round worm. The sad thing that I remember form the articel I read is that the Parrots could not be released because there was no cure for the worms they were infested with. I'm glad that is incorrect. I'm glad there is a wormer that works.
Thats so sad! There's no cure for the damage to organs caused by the migrating larvae, so thats probably why they can't be released.
This worm is commonly misdiagnosed and by the time it is figured out, damage is done. That is why I feel routine (preventative) worming is best.
 
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