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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just need a list of what I need to own a Ringneck dove. I'm getting really confused because many different sites each show that doves need something different than the last. Preferably not the most expensive things out there.

Thanks in advance,
Taubee :eek:
 

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Greetings! I'm not in Germany so I don't know about your local rules and regulations, but I can tell you some of what you'll need to provide to have a HAPPY and healthy dove.

First of all, more than anything, a single dove will need a lot of time and attention. Doves are very social birds, and chances are if you get a single bird it will bond to you and consider you its mate. You'll need to devote time to it throughout the day or reserve time before and after work to spend with your bird. If you know you won't have that kind of time, please get a pair so you won't end up with a lonely dove craving your attention. It's a very sad thing to see.

Second, it should be allowed out of the cage if possible. My dove is out for at least two hours a day, flying to his favorite spots in the house (curtain rod, high shelf, the hook that holds my fuzzy bathrobe, my head) or just hanging out with you. Fortunately dove droppings are generally compact and easy to pick up. Just be sure that if you have ceiling fans they're turned off before you open the cage. It seems obvious, but it's so easy to forget and the consequences can be devastating. Also make sure toilet lids are closed. I've known two people who lost birds because they flew into the bowl, got too wet to fly out, and drowned. Unless you're getting a tiny dove like mine (I have an Inca dove, very small) they can probably get out by themselves, but still, toilet water is kind of gross :)

The cage should have room for your bird to fly around a bit or at least be large enough for wing exercises, which most birds will do if they aren't let out regularly. Put in a toy or two; my dove's current favorite is a spinning toy made from popsicle sticks but you never know what they'll find entertaining. I change things up a bit to keep him from getting bored. Give your bird a variety of perches to keep his toes in good shape. Flat perches are best because they protect the bird's toes from the cold, but branches and other shapes are good variety.
My inca dove has a nest basket tied to the cage with zip ties and lined with fuzzy socks. That's his "home base" where he'll make his territory calls. He sleeps on a padded swing (he might be a little spoiled). If you notice your bird's nails are getting long, a sandpaper cover on one of the perches will help keep them in check.

Also be sure your bird gets either direct sunlight or a calcium and vitamin D supplement daily. Sunlight is the best option, most doves flatten out, spread their tail feathers and spread first one wing then the other to soak up all the sun they can, and it's delightful to watch because they enjoy it so much. Also provide a shallow pan of water for a bath. Some doves are funny about bathing. I had one that would fly to the sink ands sit there expectantly until I got his bath bowl and filled it with water. Necco, the dove I have now, is very private about his bathing time but loves warm water. Once a week I fill a pie dish with warm water and tiptoe out of the room and he'll do his thing and emerge soaking wet and sit like a statue until he's dry. The first time he did it he was so unlike his normal energetic self I thought he was ill, then I realized it's probably instinctual; birds are more vulnerable when they're wet and probably want to attract as little attention as possible until they're back to normal. Doves will also bathe in their water dishes, which is fine. So if your dove turns into a wet gargoyle for a couple of hours don't be alarmed :)

I don't know where you're planning to get your bird but I'd get a young one if possible and visit the aviary if you can. Two reasons for this: to check out the living conditions of the birds, and, if the birds are happy and healthy, the seller may have extra insight on your bird and his/her care.

If you can get your bird to eat pellets along with seed, that will boost the feed nutrient level. Your dove will also need grit, which is usually fortified with calcium, and helps their digestion. If you offer spray millet, do it sparingly; birds love it but it's like junk food for birds. My dove also enjoys shredded carrots and chopped up hardboiled eggs. There are a lot of good food ideas for doves on this site and even the best bird food is inexpensive, especially when compared to feeding a dog or cat.

Doves are hardy birds and easy to care for. I take my bird in for a checkup every year, but that's because he's a federally protected species and I had to get a permit to keep him. If you don't get your bird a checkup every so often, please at least make sure you find a good avian veterinarian so if your bird gets sick you don't have to scramble around trying to find one.

Although not as long-lived as parrots, doves can live 20 years or more. If you get one (or a pair), please keep in mind, especially if you know you plan to go off to college or move to a place that will not allow pets.

Ringneck doves are delightful and can get super affectionate and cuddly. And they're not just beautiful, they're smarter than most people think. I had a male ringneck as a teenager, and he played fetch and would follow commands.

I hope this helps you, and good luck. If you spend a little time poking around this site you'll find so much information on just about anything related to birds and their care.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Greetings! I'm not in Germany so I don't know about your local rules and regulations, but I can tell you some of what you'll need to provide to have a HAPPY and healthy dove.

First of all, more than anything, a single dove will need a lot of time and attention. Doves are very social birds, and chances are if you get a single bird it will bond to you and consider you its mate. You'll need to devote time to it throughout the day or reserve time before and after work to spend with your bird. If you know you won't have that kind of time, please get a pair so you won't end up with a lonely dove craving your attention. It's a very sad thing to see.

Second, it should be allowed out of the cage if possible. My dove is out for at least two hours a day, flying to his favorite spots in the house (curtain rod, high shelf, the hook that holds my fuzzy bathrobe, my head) or just hanging out with you. Fortunately dove droppings are generally compact and easy to pick up. Just be sure that if you have ceiling fans they're turned off before you open the cage. It seems obvious, but it's so easy to forget and the consequences can be devastating. Also make sure toilet lids are closed. I've known two people who lost birds because they flew into the bowl, got too wet to fly out, and drowned. Unless you're getting a tiny dove like mine (I have an Inca dove, very small) they can probably get out by themselves, but still, toilet water is kind of gross :)

The cage should have room for your bird to fly around a bit or at least be large enough for wing exercises, which most birds will do if they aren't let out regularly. Put in a toy or two; my dove's current favorite is a spinning toy made from popsicle sticks but you never know what they'll find entertaining. I change things up a bit to keep him from getting bored. Give your bird a variety of perches to keep his toes in good shape. Flat perches are best because they protect the bird's toes from the cold, but branches and other shapes are good variety.
My inca dove has a nest basket tied to the cage with zip ties and lined with fuzzy socks. That's his "home base" where he'll make his territory calls. He sleeps on a padded swing (he might be a little spoiled). If you notice your bird's nails are getting long, a sandpaper cover on one of the perches will help keep them in check.

Also be sure your bird gets either direct sunlight or a calcium and vitamin D supplement daily. Sunlight is the best option, most doves flatten out, spread their tail feathers and spread first one wing then the other to soak up all the sun they can, and it's delightful to watch because they enjoy it so much. Also provide a shallow pan of water for a bath. Some doves are funny about bathing. I had one that would fly to the sink ands sit there expectantly until I got his bath bowl and filled it with water. Necco, the dove I have now, is very private about his bathing time but loves warm water. Once a week I fill a pie dish with warm water and tiptoe out of the room and he'll do his thing and emerge soaking wet and sit like a statue until he's dry. The first time he did it he was so unlike his normal energetic self I thought he was ill, then I realized it's probably instinctual; birds are more vulnerable when they're wet and probably want to attract as little attention as possible until they're back to normal. Doves will also bathe in their water dishes, which is fine. So if your dove turns into a wet gargoyle for a couple of hours don't be alarmed :)

I don't know where you're planning to get your bird but I'd get a young one if possible and visit the aviary if you can. Two reasons for this: to check out the living conditions of the birds, and, if the birds are happy and healthy, the seller may have extra insight on your bird and his/her care.

If you can get your bird to eat pellets along with seed, that will boost the feed nutrient level. Your dove will also need grit, which is usually fortified with calcium, and helps their digestion. If you offer spray millet, do it sparingly; birds love it but it's like junk food for birds. My dove also enjoys shredded carrots and chopped up hardboiled eggs. There are a lot of good food ideas for doves on this site and even the best bird food is inexpensive, especially when compared to feeding a dog or cat.

Doves are hardy birds and easy to care for. I take my bird in for a checkup every year, but that's because he's a federally protected species and I had to get a permit to keep him. If you don't get your bird a checkup every so often, please at least make sure you find a good avian veterinarian so if your bird gets sick you don't have to scramble around trying to find one.

Although not as long-lived as parrots, doves can live 20 years or more. If you get one (or a pair), please keep in mind, especially if you know you plan to go off to college or move to a place that will not allow pets.

Ringneck doves are delightful and can get super affectionate and cuddly. And they're not just beautiful, they're smarter than most people think. I had a male ringneck as a teenager, and he played fetch and would follow commands.

I hope this helps you, and good luck. If you spend a little time poking around this site you'll find so much information on just about anything related to birds and their care.
Oh mein Gott, thank you so much for this!! I'll be sure to keep this info nearby. Thank you!! :p
 
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