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I have some yb's with sleek bodies and some with stocky bodies. At 1-2 months old, how would you choose what type of body to send to the races? It seems the slimmer bodied birds will fill out in time for the races 6-8 months out, and the stockier bodied one's may be too thick at 6-7 months old.

I have a pair of 6 week olds that are build short and thick, while another pair of the same age are thinner and more steamlined. My personal feeling is the thicker birds would do better as yb's flying the winter weather (november-march), as they should have the power to fly through bad conditions.
 

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Good question, While training fly both and see who comes home first.
 

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Good question, While training fly both and see who comes home first.
I agree with Big T on this one, I would suggest that when you start your Training Tosses you set up your electronic clock (presuming you have one) that way when the bird get home you can see which of them are coming home first and which not, you can then pick out the goodies from there.

Cheers

Andy
 

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I have some yb's with sleek bodies and some with stocky bodies. At 1-2 months old, how would you choose what type of body to send to the races? It seems the slimmer bodied birds will fill out in time for the races 6-8 months out, and the stockier bodied one's may be too thick at 6-7 months old.

I have a pair of 6 week olds that are build short and thick, while another pair of the same age are thinner and more steamlined. My personal feeling is the thicker birds would do better as yb's flying the winter weather (november-march), as they should have the power to fly through bad conditions.
The Best Answer I saw and like, was the one which said to fly them both and take some notes. Very difficult to judge a bird's ability by how pretty it might look. The ones with "Sleek Bodies"...or the one's with the ribbed abs... power lifter type ? Or however else you might describe your bird's "body type". Even with the bird in my hand, I am never really sure 50% of the time. The training basket and the races is the only way to tell. And to be really sure, you may have to race the bird for a couple of years.
 

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People are always saying train them and clock them but this is not a race. It will not give you true race results. First you are probably not out to 135 miles (our short races) when you are training, second all the birds are going to the same loft, not how it is in a race, third do you release these birds in different groups? Because if I release my birds all together they all come home together unless one or two can't keep up and are behind. Even if i broke my birds into 2 groups or more the groups would come together. Some may be faster but how do you tell what ones may be keeping the others flying slower? If you are single tossing then alot of people think that a single tossed bird will have nothing to compete against and therfore not fly at top speed.

Like was said the only true test is to races them. Winners come in all shapes and sizes and even though you feel if one is bigger then anouther you can't see the pigeon that is on the inside. You can't see heart, motivation, drive, condition, esc.
 

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People are always saying train them and clock them but this is not a race. It will not give you true race results. First you are probably not out to 135 miles (our short races) when you are training, second all the birds are going to the same loft, not how it is in a race, third do you release these birds in different groups? Because if I release my birds all together they all come home together unless one or two can't keep up and are behind. Even if i broke my birds into 2 groups or more the groups would come together. Some may be faster but how do you tell what ones may be keeping the others flying slower? If you are single tossing then alot of people think that a single tossed bird will have nothing to compete against and therfore not fly at top speed.

Like was said the only true test is to races them. Winners come in all shapes and sizes and even though you feel if one is bigger then anouther you can't see the pigeon that is on the inside. You can't see heart, motivation, drive, condition, esc.
While I agree with everything you said, remember, the bird doesn't know it is in a race only you do. So by timing the results from all the releases you bring up, you get an idea of how fast your birds are and how quickly they trap. This in turn allows you NOT to send a consistantly slow bird to a race, but you said it right when you said the only true test is to race them and see how they stack up with the rest...
 

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I'll go with Big T's advice because you got no data to work on for now. But as Randy says "Winners come in all shapes and sizes."
 

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While I agree with everything you said, remember, the bird doesn't know it is in a race only you do. So by timing the results from all the releases you bring up, you get an idea of how fast your birds are and how quickly they trap. This in turn allows you NOT to send a consistantly slow bird to a race, but you said it right when you said the only true test is to race them and see how they stack up with the rest...

My question is do you seperate them? Single toss? What do you do to get them to break apart and come home at different times. I have never had pigeons that would not come home in the groups they were released in. I lied today I released 50 and had one come in 10 mintues in front of all the rest. First time I ever seen this happen.
 

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Let me tell a little story. I had a hen last year that consistantly came late from races. She would be 20th 30th or whatever. Sometimes not in the clock. I had not put her in our auction race but we had a regular open race the same release as the auction just a half hour later same day. So, at this point she had raced 6 races and not placed in the top 10. I sent her to the race that was the same as our aution race 340 miles for me. She came in 8th in the race but if she would have been in the auction race she would have placed in the top 5 and won me some good money. She flew 1150ypm from 340 miles. I am now breeding from her.
 

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I think some birds will get better once they matured. But I still prefer consistent birds.
 

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You will get as many answers as number of people who reply. I agree to allow the basket to determine the best, however, because a bird is slow does not mean it is a bad bird. It may very well mean that bird is more suited for the longer distances and/or tougher head winds. Only the basket and flying this bird at all distances and in all weather will truley tell you what this birds capabilities are. I dont go so much by "long cast" or "apple body" selection as I do the wing type and feather shapes. I cannot speak for anyone else as beauty is in the eye of the beholder and I just know what my stock types have done. I had a bird that has not flown well at any distance less than 350 as a YB or OB but if it goes out to 400 or more it is always at the top of the sheet. Would someone get rid of this bird because it never produced at the smaller distances? Probably, but they would be missing out on a good tough long distance pigeon!! Only the basket told me that over a period of 2 years not just a 10 week span!! I think too many flyers are keeping only the birds that showed up on the fast days with ideal conditions and it is hurting their stock loft in the long run. Every loft needs these types of birds but dont over look the "plodders" that will always be in the top on the tough head winds, rain, and other incliment weather. They will make you shine when others have to hang their heads and make excuses.
 

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My question is do you seperate them? Single toss? What do you do to get them to break apart and come home at different times. I have never had pigeons that would not come home in the groups they were released in. I lied today I released 50 and had one come in 10 mintues in front of all the rest. First time I ever seen this happen.
I do them all, I start will two groups, (just is case). I use an old bird that knows the way home and start my training, North, West, South and East. Each time I mix up the groups so different birds fly together. Once I know they know the way home I release them two at a time. Haven't done the single releases but I might this year and see.
 
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