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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This summer whilst on a rescues, I would have all kinds of birds temporarily at my flat whilst waiting for me to take them to the aviary. When I had notice that the council were coming round to inspect the property again, I stopped doing rescues for a while. Because of this, a blackbird baby ended up staying at my flat. I raised her and she is now a big healthy female blackbird(I used to think she was a starling). The thing is, she is on her own. I do not want to just send her off to a big aviary where she may still be on her own, I feel some obligation to take care of her. I would love to keep her, she is a happy little thing and sings happily in the morning. She also seems to enjoy teasing the pigeons as she can move much faster than they can lol. I do not feel I can keep her in isolation from other blackbirds, so either I must find another blackbird, or I have to find someone else who has blackbirds who could take her. I could do with some tips on how to look after her anyway. I was wondering if anyone knew of a forum or other group for the discussion of blackbirds? Please let me know if you do. Thanks,

Brian.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am not sure what to do with this blackbird. She seems happy for the time being, but in the long run, perhaps next summer, she is going to want a mate. She also has none of her own species her for company. She keeps trying to sit next to the pigeons but the pigeon do not like it. I think they probably sit together in the wild. I will have to look around and find out what others do with blackbirds that have been rescued?
 

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Im very sure this is one reason that rehabbers need to be trained and have a license to to do this. they know how to prepair for a release all along. at least here in the US that is how they handle it. If you have licensed rehabbers in your area that is who I would call with advice on how to get this bird back to where she belongs which is in the wild. they really should not be thought of as pets. Thinking about what to do now is late in coming. anyone taking on a baby to help needs to think about the future and what needs to done from the beginning. finding someone who is going to release more of the same kind would be great if you can find that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I know in a ideal situation it would be great if I could hand these birds onto proper rehabbers. Believe me, every mistake I make haunts me. But as I explained before, the whole reason I got into this is because I could find no one who would treat the birds that I found sometime in very distressing states. The only help available, if you pushed the matter, was someone from the RSPCA who would collect the bird(usually a pigeon) and take it back to be put down. All the rehab centers for the London area are on the outskirts, and the fares are too expensive for me to be going back and forth from the center of London to the outskirts. I have joined a charity that is just getting established and is specifically for the central London area, and we are totally overloaded with calls because we operate a no kill policy and everyone who rings one of the big agencies ends up ringing us after because they do not want the bird put down. The aviary that the charity has is still being built and is a present only holding a mixed bunch of about 100 birds. I could send the blackbird there, but as there are blackbirds happily flying about just outside my door, it seems to me that with a little help I can probably release the bird locally. It needs some time to acclimatise to the outside, which could be done better by someone who already has some blackbirds, hence my request. At a push I can try and slow release the bird myself, but I am not happy doing this. In this one occasion, if I can find a rehab center that knows how to deal with blackbirds, I may be willing to pay the fare to take her there. I would rather avoid the expense though, as it all comes out of a small kitty that I have to buy medicines.
 

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I would think that LWP should know where you can get information and whatever help you need, Brian. After all, that is in the UK and you have a British bird there.

LWP does give the impression that there are two, if not three, aviaries for their use at the Retreat.

There are relatively few UK members who are regulars on here, and probably even fewer who have the experience with rehabbing Eurasian Blackbirds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree I can pass the blackbird on to Maciej and he will send it to the aviary, or probably end up looking after it himself for a while, until he finds someone with experience with them and can take the bird. I was just trying to take some personal responsibility for the birds future as it has ended up with me. I have been able to find chat groups for starlings and all kinds of other birds, but nothing for blackbirds. I just wanted to check that no one else had access to a source of information that I may have missed.
 

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I know in a ideal situation it would be great if I could hand these birds onto proper rehabbers. Believe me, every mistake I make haunts me. But as I explained before, the whole reason I got into this is because I could find no one who would treat the birds that I found sometime in very distressing states. The only help available, if you pushed the matter, was someone from the RSPCA who would collect the bird(usually a pigeon) and take it back to be put down. All the rehab centers for the London area are on the outskirts, and the fares are too expensive for me to be going back and forth from the center of London to the outskirts. I have joined a charity that is just getting established and is specifically for the central London area, and we are totally overloaded with calls because we operate a no kill policy and everyone who rings one of the big agencies ends up ringing us after because they do not want the bird put down. The aviary that the charity has is still being built and is a present only holding a mixed bunch of about 100 birds. I could send the blackbird there, but as there are blackbirds happily flying about just outside my door, it seems to me that with a little help I can probably release the bird locally. It needs some time to acclimatise to the outside, which could be done better by someone who already has some blackbirds, hence my request. At a push I can try and slow release the bird myself, but I am not happy doing this. In this one occasion, if I can find a rehab center that knows how to deal with blackbirds, I may be willing to pay the fare to take her there. I would rather avoid the expense though, as it all comes out of a small kitty that I have to buy medicines.
The thing is you are getting experience, IMO all you need to do is educate yourself with the same information licensed rehabbers learn. you may not get or have a licsense but atleast you know what to do, how to handle or not handle, only if needed situations and releases and soft release, feeding techniques ect.. I think because you are willing you would be good at it. and really it is your responsiblity if you are choosing to do this type care.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I will be much keener to take on extra training once the battle with the council is over. There is a chance they will win at court, they do not want any tenants keeping pigeon even as pets, they want to make the pigeon an outcast so they can do things to them without comeback, and people like me make that difficult. If I win and they are not able to force me to get rid of my pigeons, then I will be looking to take on extra training. If I lose, I think I will retire to Dorset :)
 

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Unless she's had a mirror, she won't recognize the other Blackbirds as being the same as herself. Personally, I would give her a mirror for a week or so and then take her to the aviary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That is a point that I had not thought of, but luckily I have plastic mirrors all round the room because the pigeons like them, so she has had a lot of time to get used to her own image. I will keep tabs on her and the instructions are that she is to be returned to me if she is not coping well. I like having her around, she is very cheerful and copies my whistles, but I feel sooner or later she will want a mate and it may have bad psychological consequences for her to be alone. I feel for her own good I have to let her go to the aviary. If she returns then I am quite happy for her to stay with me and the pigeons for the rest of her life, but I have to give her this shot at a normal life.
 
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