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I have two blue bars from the same parents that have white flight feathers evenly and for all four flights. Several other birds from the cross do not have the white flights, one has an uneven amount (2 on one side, 1 on the other), and the other is a spread with dark feathers all around.

What is up with genes for white flights? Is it a variation of the pied gene? What is its predictability?
 

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I think white flight is its own gene, but I'm not sure. But of course, as with everything, there are many different variations of white flight birds. Some will have all white flights, others may only have one on one wing. I don't remember what all the different white genes are, so hopefully Bill, Frank, or George can help.
 

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It can get very confusing

I have two blue bars from the same parents that have white flight feathers evenly and for all four flights. Several other birds from the cross do not have the white flights, one has an uneven amount (2 on one side, 1 on the other), and the other is a spread with dark feathers all around.

What is up with genes for white flights? Is it a variation of the pied gene? What is its predictability?
The white flight gene is listed as dominant but I wonder if it should be partial dominant, not really sure. At any rate, it is able to produce white flights from only one parent that has it and it is not a gene that can be carried, ie, not recessive.

There are pied forms of several types that are recessive as well as some that are dominant, sorting out just which ones you have in a flock of pigeons becomes difficult.

The fact that there are many different things that can cause white flights, some dominant, some recessive makes the sorting out which ones you have somewhat difficult.

Hope this helps but I know it isn't alot of help. Everyone who ponders this has the same dilemma unless they know very specifically which pied genes have been brought into their pigeons. People who raise homers and rollers and breeds that have alittle of everything have a difficult task in sorting these out.

Bill
 
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