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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have about 200, good quality, adult white homing pigeons for sale for $10.00 each.
I live in Dayton, Ohio and will ship if necessary.
If interested please call me at (937)570-6088.
Keith
[email protected]
http://www.freewebs.com/kjcii/
 

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I had been lead to believe that birds of prey may "go after" ones that look different from the rest of the flock...so when releasing ferals for example, you look for a flock of the same general color..not let a white one go in a flock of greys...I think ANY flock of pigeons will attract the attention of a bird of prey...not sure a flock of white homers would be any more attractive than a flock of another color.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have seen coopers hawks catch sitting pigeons and slow pigeons, like rollers, in the air, but have never seen one catch an adult homer while it is flying.
I have heard the same thing about color attracting hawks, but hawks always seem to go after the easiest bird to catch.
I have seen adult homers go missing for a few hours when chased off by a coopers hawk.
Keith
 

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I agree with kippermom. Hawks and falcons love pigeons, but it's said to be more likely to go after the one who stands out the most, whether it be because of its color or because it's slow, etc. In the end, I think it's basically they take what they can catch. But I could see why a white bird in a flock of grays or a gray in a flock of whites would attract the hawk's attention.
But going along with what Keith said, I too have never seen one of my homers get caught (but they have been hit) in flight. Now if it was sitting when the hawk attacked, it may have not been so lucky. But from what I've seen, if they can take off and get going, it's hard for the hawk to get a good enough hold to kill it. Injuries and missing feathers will happen though.
Now just because I haven't seen it, doesn't mean it hasn't happened. I do know that adult homers can out fly hawks in level flight, especially the bigger ones like red-tails. Diving falcons are a bit different though :eek:
 

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I saw a hawk go after some grackels that were flocking...you know how they migrate in big flocks...of course they are black so...if he was going to get one it would be the slow weak ones or young ones...so if a hawk is hungry I do think that is what he would look for, not color....I don't think they are too selective on what color his dinner is going to be...they just want to eat SOMETHING, and a flock of birds no matter color or type would attract a hungry BOP...just my opinion, but Im not an expert;)
 

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Hawks, like all animals are color blind. On a clear day, its hard to see the whites in the sky. Not that the hawks would catch them up there anyway's. I think you will be safe with the whites, I have some whites but mostly bb,bc's, cant say that I lose more of one color over the other.
 

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Hawks, like all animals are color blind. On a clear day, its hard to see the whites in the sky. Not that the hawks would catch them up there anyway's. I think you will be safe with the whites, I have some whites but mostly bb,bc's, cant say that I lose more of one color over the other.
I don't know where you got your information, but it certainly isn't correct. The "color" of the bird has nothing to do with whether a hawk will go after it or not. It's whether the "color" of the bird stands out in the flock.......ie.....1 white bird, 20 blue birds.....AND, hawks will go after the easiest bird to catch,....ie......one that is sick or injured and just can't get away fast enough.

http://www.bio.bris.ac.uk/research/vision/4d.htm

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080308171911AAOHpCe

http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/37303

http://www.ksbirds.org/kos/Color.htm

Birds see color, i.e., they have color vision. Their color vision is not only good, but it is actually better than our own. These two definitive statements describe what vision researchers are pretty sure is true - however, at the highest levels of scientific rigor they have not been firmly established. Up until the early 1970s it was widely thought that birds had trichromatic (3 photoreceptor) color vision comparable to that of humans, or perhaps a bit inferior to ours. Then, around 1972, it was discovered that birds can see light in the near-ultraviolet (uv) range and series of new studies began. Today it is widely accepted that the avian eye, not the human eye, is the quintessential color vision system It is now believed that birds see more colors (hues) than we do and the colors also appear more saturated to birds than do ours to us. They are able to do this because they have four (or more!) cones and pigmented oil droplets in those photorecpetors. Whereas we have short, middle and long (also called blue, green, & red, respectively) cones, they not only have short, middle, and long cones, but also a uv cone.
 

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Color blindness is a condition in which people have mild to severe difficulty identifying colors. Color blind people may not be able to recognize various shades of colors and, in some cases, cannot recognize colors at all.

So I guess they are not color blind. They must color preference blindness
 

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Speaking of Keith C., I never heard back from him since Aug/Sept of 2010. He said he was in the process of moving and sorting things out.

Never heard from him again after 2 more emails. He hasn't updated his website as well. So I hope he is ok.

I got some nice birds from him too.
 
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