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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From my reading I have an idea about Widowhood methods, but feel I am still missing some of the basics. Can someone explain from the begining for this novice. What is it based on and how does it work? What kind of facilities are required? Why are some racers opposed to it?

Thank you,
Mike
 

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There are as many different ideas about how to fly widowhood as there are fanciers. The "basics" is all you need. Then you do what works for YOU from there.
Also, there's Widowhood and there's Double Widowhood. The difference in the two is that with Widowhood, you fly only the cocks, which in my opinion is a waste of a lot of good hens. Double Widowhood you fly both sexes. No matter which one you fly, you need a loft with two sections so that you can keep the birds separated during the week and during the off season.
Do a search on here. There's been quite a few discussions about the subject.
Can't say why some fanciers don't like it. Some say it takes too much time. I don't think it takes any more time than any other way of flying.
 

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lots of racers are won with widowhood system. but i tried it and it was to much hard work for me and dint injoy my racing if i carried on with it i would have packed in but thats me its a good way of racing and if unlike me you got the time patiants go for it i like it simple and stick to natural.good luck mate.
 

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I don't like it because I prefer doing things naturally? One day when I have more time I may try double widowhood, but never just plain widowhood. You could have a whole loft full of champion hens and never know it, because all they'd do is sit at home and look pretty for the boys :rolleyes:
 

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From my reading I have an idea about Widowhood methods, but feel I am still missing some of the basics. Can someone explain from the begining for this novice. What is it based on and how does it work? What kind of facilities are required? Why are some racers opposed to it?

Thank you,
Mike
Hi MIKE, Well the last question first.I would say that there are other systems that some racers use and like natural system for old birds, or the dark or light system for young birds. I have known people that flew widowhood during the short and middle races. That at some point during the middle distance races started setting up some birds in the natural system for the long races. But enough of that...........For widowhood you need two sections in your loft one for cocks and the other for hens.The cocks section will have nestboxes for the cocks.The hens section will have only perches. Each cock has a nest box of his own and is mated to one of the hens.Two and a half to Three months before the old bird races the cock and his hen are permitted to raise ONE YOUNGSTER at weening time the hen is removed the compleats the weening and the young bird is put in the young bird section.From this point on the cocks only get to see the hen for short periods after they(the cocks) have been flown.All this is done so that the cock learns that the faster he gets home to 1 protect his nest box and to see his hen.There are other tricks used to motivate the cock.I am sure we will hear from others on this subject so I close for now. .........GEORGE;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess I just don't speak "pigeon." Four responses and I still don't know what widowhood is. Thanks George, you were the closest.

The research continues.

Mike
 

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One youngster?

Three months before the old bird races the cock and his hen are permitted to raise ONE YOUNGSTER at weening time the hen is removed the compleats the weening and the young bird is put in the young bird section.
From this point on the cocks only get to see the hen for short periods after they (the cocks) have been flown.
All this is done so that the cock learns that the faster he gets home to protect his nest box and to see his hen.
OK, now I'm :confused:
I understand the part about rationing time together with their mates to provide the birds an incentive to get home faster, but don't get why the pair is only permitted to raise one "youngster," when typically the hens lay two eggs in a clutch (or would that be one "round" of youngsters?) I can see how feeding one squeeker at a time might be easier on the pair, but what happens to the other egg? Does it get fostered, or become omelette? :eek:
 

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One baby is much easier on the parents. Gives them that bond to home, but doesn't stress them nearly as much. The other egg can be thrown out, or fostered if you wish.
 
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OK, now I'm :confused:
I understand the part about rationing time together with their mates to provide the birds an incentive to get home faster, but don't get why the pair is only permitted to raise one "youngster," when typically the hens lay two eggs in a clutch (or would that be one "round" of youngsters?) I can see how feeding one squeeker at a time might be easier on the pair, but what happens to the other egg? Does it get fostered, or become omelette? :eek:
just replace it with a fake egg so they dont wonder what happened to it or like Becky said toss it ;)
 
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