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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This website ( http://wangandwu.com/janssen.aspx) shows Janssen brother's breeders back in the 90's. It shows wing pictures with measurements! The interesting pictures are the last two. The primary wings seem very long compared to the secondary. I actually suppose that these are medium (or even long) distance birds. But I thought the Janssen's are sprint birds.(?)

Dr. Walker talks about wing shape in this article: (http://www.auspigeonco.com.au/). Click on the article section and find the one titled: FLIGHT AND WING STRUCTURE.

What are your observations in your lofts?
 

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Thanks for the informative links.

Don't have a loft, so can't add much info.

On March 5th an acquaintance brought me a starving squeaker, Findi, rescued from under a train bridge in Cologne. Feathers were missing from outer left wing, and there had been or was an infection. Where the longest seven feathers would attach to the wing, there was a mass of inflamed tissue. Looked like someone had added several chunks of dark pink chewing gum to the area. Also, he didn't use his left leg, and let the left foot dangle, apparently useless.

He recovered and now goes out daily to fly with the local flock (still eats and sleeps indoors).

Before his left wing feathers grew out, the full plumage of the right wing working against the delayed feather growth of the left wing caused his right breast muscles to be much more developed and bulked out than the corresponding muscles on the left side.

He couldn't compensate by beating the left wing more rapidly than the right wing. Good example of forced bilateral synchronicity.

(I don't know if I've added anything that everyone doesn't already know. But, sometimes the seemingly obvious isn't.)

Larry
 

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Larry,

Yep. There was other experiment with birds to show that when they added weights to the wings, their muscles grew bigger. It was, I believe, an experiment is isotonic exercise or something. I don't remember well now.
 

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I use the wing/flight shape and size a lot when I determine whether a bird will be better at shorter or longer distances. The article by Dr. Walker was in the Digest, and I really liked it. Lots of good info, and I go with every bit of it.

Longer primaries with space between the tips of the last few would be your longer distance birds. And those with more full wings (I call them duck wings :p) are more equiped for the shorter distances. It's common sense, the more full the wing, the less space between the feathers, which means they'll move quicker on the downstroke. However, pulling the wings up will use more energy, so they'll probably have a harder time holding up on longer flights.
Even though you want some space between the last flights to make it easier to pull up, you still want the wing to be full so that the bird actually gets somewhere with the energy it uses. It can get a bit complicated :p

Thank goodness pigeons naturally shift their feathers in flight to help pull up and push down, or else we'd really have a problem trying to breed the 'perfect' wings!
 
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