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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

My dove received a small wound on her wing when i bought her the other day due to her flying around the cage and brushing up against the bars and things. I didn't want to spook her any more, so i let her be with it, thinking it was a small wound and that i dont want to exacerbate it. This was also suggested to me by the people on the forum here. However, now she is flying around a bunch and a second ago she flew against the bars for a long time and i notice that there is blood all over them now. I am feeling like i should administer to the wound since its bleeding so much, but i also don't know if thats the best thing to do, and i also want to know what you think i can do stop her flying around like that. My father suggested clipping her wings, but i dont know how to do that.

Should i try to minister to the wound, and should i try to clip her wings, or should i do something else like let her fly around outside a bit? Why do you think she is so unsettled and flying around and hurting herself?

Her new cage is about 1 feet by two feet, and one and a half to two feet tall. The cage she was in when i bought her was like a shoe box.
 

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the cage still sounds small, usually it is best to keep doves in a long cage with more floor space rather than a high one. two foot by two foot being the smallest. they like to go from perch to perch or side to side.. I would keep her in a quiet room maybe even with a towel covering part of it..untill she settles down, it may take a week or two for her to calm down..is this a ringneck dove?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yes, i think she is a ringneck dove. She is a very tiny, brown dove. I do have a spare room, though id be afraid to let her loose in it with my cat running around, even if i kept the door closed. But do you think i should try to catch her and put something on her wound, or to cut her wings? Maybe for the moment i should just try putting a perch on the other side of the cage, since i previously placed them all at different levels on just one side so she wouldnt poop on her nest.
 

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It sounds like she might have a broken blood feather. My Edmund broke one last fall and got blood everywhere. DO NOT CLIP THE WINGS--if she has a bunch of blood feathers right now she could bleed considerably more if you cut any feathers.
Do you have any friends who are particularly good with parrots/other birds? Experienced people can help you pull that bad blood feather out. I've also heard of people packing bad blood feathers with the same stuff you use on a bloody toenail. That might also work for you.

Brown? That sounds like a mourning dove or some kind of exotic.

If she is any darker than these, she is not a ringneck:
http://www.dovepage.com/species/domestic/Ringneck/colors/wild.jpg
http://www.dovepage.com/species/domestic/Ringneck/colors/crested.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
sorry it took so long, but heres the pictures. My computer doesnt want to upload anything for some reason so i had to email them to my sister to upload them, so it took a while for them to get up. Also, I had to catch her and have someone else take them, and in the end she got scared and jumped out of my hand, losing a bunch of feathers in the process, so i dont feel so good about how they happened, but here they are...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/?saved=1

I dont there are broken blood feathers, i think she just is reopening a scab on her shoulder which she got from flying against the bars of her cage, which are wooden and probably a bit scratchy. For the moment, ive done as Spirit wings suggested and put her a room by herself to fly around, and in a couple days i think i will put her back in the cage and make sure she has two perches adjacent to each other, which she didn't before, to fly back and forth to.

But i'd like to also get your opinion on her tail - shes biting it up to pieces as you can see, and im not sure why. Do you think she has bugs on her?
 

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sorry it took so long, but heres the pictures. My computer doesnt want to upload anything for some reason so i had to email them to my sister to upload them, so it took a while for them to get up. Also, I had to catch her and have someone else take them, and in the end she got scared and jumped out of my hand, losing a bunch of feathers in the process, so i dont feel so good about how they happened, but here they are...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/?saved=1

I dont there are broken blood feathers, i think she just is reopening a scab on her shoulder which she got from flying against the bars of her cage, which are wooden and probably a bit scratchy. For the moment, ive done as Spirit wings suggested and put her a room by herself to fly around, and in a couple days i think i will put her back in the cage and make sure she has two perches adjacent to each other, which she didn't before, to fly back and forth to.

But i'd like to also get your opinion on her tail - shes biting it up to pieces as you can see, and im not sure why. Do you think she has bugs on her?
Couldn't see the tail very well. What I could see makes it look like when she moves around in the cage, the bars are rubbing her tail and messing it up. Oftentimes, when you see a bird with a messed up tail it is indicative of a cage that is too small. (Or the bird decided to nest in the corner of the cage, etc.) What size is this cage?

Yeah, you're right that this is a skin wound and not a feather wound. I would still avoid clipping her wings. Doves have absolutely no defense besides flight. Also, if one clips wings incorrectly (such that a bird cannot glide sufficiently) they often will jump off of things without knowing they won't fly and falling--which can cause terrible injury.
Mom and I looked through your pics and I think it will probably heal up on its own. Maybe give some neosporin on the wound to keep it clean and soft. (though do keep in mind that you also want to give the wound some air.)

If I'm remembering right, when a dove is afraid they can instant-shed some feathers to get away from a threat that has ahold of them. It's also possible that when she escaped you grabbed tighter and pulled out the feathers, but I just wanted to let you know that it is possible that she chose to lose those feathers so you don't feel quite so horrible.

Once she heals up, I think it will be time for you guys to work on taming and handling with her. A lot of people here can help walk you through this process. But it really is necessary that you guys work with her, because it will not only improve her quality of life (and yours'!), but also make life easier and less stressful in the case of possible future illness/injury.
The first step to taming is hanging out near the bird talking gently. You need to do this until the bird is comfortable with your presence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh good. Hopefully she will heal up. I was a bit worried about her. As for the cage and the tail, my sisters added some more pictures to the link, and you should be able to get a good sense of the size of the cage from the pictures. I also have a picture of the new room she is in for the moment, though i think id like to put her back in the cage and place it back in the living room soon, so i can see her whenever i pass through.

As for taming and handling her,I do want to build a friendship with her, so if you have an tips for that i would be very happy to hear whatever you have to say. Thats probably the next thread i would start.

Also, do you have any idea species she is? I cant find any matches for her among the birds i've looked at. Furthermore, she doesn't seem to be any of the doves natural to the country i bought her in (Morocoo)
 

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Oh good. Hopefully she will heal up. I was a bit worried about her. As for the cage and the tail, my sisters added some more pictures to the link, and you should be able to get a good sense of the size of the cage from the pictures. I also have a picture of the new room she is in for the moment, though i think id like to put her back in the cage and place it back in the living room soon, so i can see her whenever i pass through.

As for taming and handling her,I do want to build a friendship with her, so if you have an tips for that i would be very happy to hear whatever you have to say. Thats probably the next thread i would start.

Also, do you have any idea species she is? I cant find any matches for her among the birds i've looked at. Furthermore, she doesn't seem to be any of the doves natural to the country i bought her in (Morocoo)

I just got really sad from reading where you got this dove.. it looks to be a collard dove and I can bet my britches it was a wild caught. For him to act that crazy sent flags up with me..because domestic doves do not flip out as much as that... he probably had a mate that was left behind or caught and sold as well.. pretty sad IMO.. not sure if this bird will tame up or not..but I would get a second dove for him atleast... what a lonesome life in cage with no mate to keep busy with.... domestics can be handled and kept busy and are tame...for this guy it may not happen.
 

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Oh good. Hopefully she will heal up. I was a bit worried about her. As for the cage and the tail, my sisters added some more pictures to the link, and you should be able to get a good sense of the size of the cage from the pictures. I also have a picture of the new room she is in for the moment, though i think id like to put her back in the cage and place it back in the living room soon, so i can see her whenever i pass through.

As for taming and handling her,I do want to build a friendship with her, so if you have an tips for that i would be very happy to hear whatever you have to say. Thats probably the next thread i would start.

Also, do you have any idea species she is? I cant find any matches for her among the birds i've looked at. Furthermore, she doesn't seem to be any of the doves natural to the country i bought her in (Morocoo)
From this pic ( http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5852834028/in/photostream ) I think you're ok on size. This bird, if it tames enough for it not to panic and injure itself, will need time to fly out of the cage in a closed room.

When I had a cockatiel who was extremely fearful b/c of mistreatment by the previous owners--where I started was talking/quietly singing to him beside the cage. When he calmed about that process, I also started reading stories to him (silly I know.) Eventually, he wanted to be out and following me around. (Be careful that your bird doesn't get outside or into any hazards indoors. Best to do this in a quiet closed room with no mirrors and curtained windows.)
If this is a wild caught bird, it could take a very long time, so be patient with the poor sweetheart.
 

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If it were me, I would take him back to morocco and find a collard dove colony and set him free...
Sam, any idea how long this bird has been in captivity? Is it possible for you to release the bird in its natural habitat?
I'm sure that you could purchase a domesticated ringneck dove (or pair of ringnecks) to replace this bird and who would be a lot easier to tame down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I dont think this is a wild bird - the man i purchased it from had a bunch of them, and he was raising them himself it seemed. There were a bunch of pigeons walking free around his shop who were homed in to it, a bunch of these doves in the back in small cages, and on the bottom of his shop was a row of shelves with baby chicks squeaking away in them. It seems more likely to me, what with the size of the pigeon industry here, that they are raised domestic doves and not wild ones. Releasing it back into the wild seems to me like it may be more the death sentence sort of thing for a domestic that doesn't know to take care of itself than giving a bird its freedom, but i don't know. I do know that most of the pigeons and doves i've seen here are hand raised, so i'm not sure i want to take that risk of letting him free. For the record, though, i am still in Morocco and i could look for a wild colony to release him into. I plan to be here for as many as twelve years, so i could certainly do what i have to do to give him what he needs. But i don't think you should feel too bad thats he a Moroccan bird - most of the pigeon lovers in the world are from the middle east and Africa, so its hard to say if he's been abused. I've never seen the people here warm up to me like they have when they see me walking around with a pigeon.

Also, he's been pretty placent for the last few weeks, so i think he's at least been in captivity for a number of years and grown used to it. The problem i think was more that he didn't have the adjacent perch to fly to, and because of the structure of this wooden cage he thinks he can land on the thick round bamboo sides, but fails to. Since i've put the perch in he's not been too bad. Honestly, id be more afraid to release and take the risk of him dying in the wild than to keep him and tame him. Im willing to take the time it needs to do that, too. But anyway, i'll only do whats good for the bird.
 

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I dont think this is a wild bird - the man i purchased it from had a bunch of them, and he was raising them himself it seemed. There were a bunch of pigeons walking free around his shop who were homed in to it, a bunch of these doves in the back in small cages, and on the bottom of his shop was a row of shelves with baby chicks squeaking away in them. It seems more likely to me, what with the size of the pigeon industry here, that they are raised domestic doves and not wild ones. Releasing it back into the wild seems to me like it may be more the death sentence sort of thing for a domestic that doesn't know to take care of itself than giving a bird its freedom, but i don't know. I do know that most of the pigeons and doves i've seen here are hand raised, so i'm not sure i want to take that risk of letting him free. For the record, though, i am still in Morocco and i could look for a wild colony to release him into. I plan to be here for as many as twelve years, so i could certainly do what i have to do to give him what he needs. But i don't think you should feel too bad thats he a Moroccan bird - most of the pigeon lovers in the world are from the middle east and Africa, so its hard to say if he's been abused. I've never seen the people here warm up to me like they have when they see me walking around with a pigeon.

Also, he's been pretty placent for the last few weeks, so i think he's at least been in captivity for a number of years and grown used to it. The problem i think was more that he didn't have the adjacent perch to fly to, and because of the structure of this wooden cage he thinks he can land on the thick round bamboo sides, but fails to. Since i've put the perch in he's not been too bad. Honestly, id be more afraid to release and take the risk of him dying in the wild than to keep him and tame him. Im willing to take the time it needs to do that, too. But anyway, i'll only do whats good for the bird.
Yeah, you probably are right that he's captive bred. You are also correct that it's usually best for a captive raised bird to stay in captivity. Good to hear that he's calming down a bit.

Are the wounds looking better today? What's new with the tail?
 

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Oh, and taking a look at your bird as a whole rather than focusing on the injuries, I'm guessing that it's a Eurasian collared dove, African collared dove, or a wild type ringneck. Is it cooing at all? Sometimes you can tell which of these by it's sound. (Ringnecks laugh while Eurasian collared doves scream, etc.)

Info pages for you on each species:
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/eurasian_collared-dove/id
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_Collared_Dove
http://www.dovepage.com/species/domestic/Ringneck/ringneckdove.html
 

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I dont think this is a wild bird - the man i purchased it from had a bunch of them, and he was raising them himself it seemed. There were a bunch of pigeons walking free around his shop who were homed in to it, a bunch of these doves in the back in small cages, and on the bottom of his shop was a row of shelves with baby chicks squeaking away in them. It seems more likely to me, what with the size of the pigeon industry here, that they are raised domestic doves and not wild ones. Releasing it back into the wild seems to me like it may be more the death sentence sort of thing for a domestic that doesn't know to take care of itself than giving a bird its freedom, but i don't know. I do know that most of the pigeons and doves i've seen here are hand raised, so i'm not sure i want to take that risk of letting him free. For the record, though, i am still in Morocco and i could look for a wild colony to release him into. I plan to be here for as many as twelve years, so i could certainly do what i have to do to give him what he needs. But i don't think you should feel too bad thats he a Moroccan bird - most of the pigeon lovers in the world are from the middle east and Africa, so its hard to say if he's been abused. I've never seen the people here warm up to me like they have when they see me walking around with a pigeon.

Also, he's been pretty placent for the last few weeks, so i think he's at least been in captivity for a number of years and grown used to it. The problem i think was more that he didn't have the adjacent perch to fly to, and because of the structure of this wooden cage he thinks he can land on the thick round bamboo sides, but fails to. Since i've put the perch in he's not been too bad. Honestly, id be more afraid to release and take the risk of him dying in the wild than to keep him and tame him. Im willing to take the time it needs to do that, too. But anyway, i'll only do whats good for the bird.
hand raised domestic doves do not filp out so bad they bleed.. the actions speak of a wild dove.. Iam not even sure if Eurasian collard doves are domesticated..that may explain it.. Ringneck doves are the domesticated ones. and I have never seen one freak out so bad in a cage it bled.. if this bird was handraised it would be sitting on your hand and playing with your hair and eyebrows and be pretty comfortable... this bird is not tame from your discription... and collard doves are wild and can live that way.. they are considerd a invasive species..so yes they can live out there.. but I know that is not what you want to do.. .. lone doves who are not domestic do not do very good if they are wild like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Im not sure - personally, i dont think he was doing so bad in the cage that i think he was wild. 90 percent of the time he was very calm, it was only once in a while that he would try to fly around the cage, and after failing to land on the sidebeams he would turn around and fly back to the ground or a perch. but anyway, I guess i will go back to the vendor and ask him where he got his birds. You probably are right that thats not quite domestic behaviour - but i also dont know if this would be a captured bird. What seems possible to me is that it was hand raised in the store and never interacted with, because it was certainly calm in its cage there.
 

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hand raised domestic doves do not filp out so bad they bleed.. the actions speak of a wild dove.. Iam not even sure if Eurasian collard doves are domesticated..that may explain it.. Ringneck doves are the domesticated ones. and I have never seen one freak out so bad in a cage it bled.. if this bird was handraised it would be sitting on your hand and playing with your hair and eyebrows and be pretty comfortable... this bird is not tame from your discription... and collard doves are wild and can live that way.. they are considerd a invasive species..so yes they can live out there.. but I know that is not what you want to do.. .. lone doves who are not domestic do not do very good if they are wild like that.
Eurasian collared doves are only semi-domesticated. They haven't been bred for thousands of years like ringnecks (though they are a related species) but have been commonly kept as pets anyway. (That's how they wound up in the US.)
It is entirely plausible that he has a bird only one or two generations from wild that is still captive raised. This would make it flightier, while still being incapable of a life in the wild.
 

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Im not sure - personally, i dont think he was doing so bad in the cage that i think he was wild. 90 percent of the time he was very calm, it was only once in a while that he would try to fly around the cage, and after failing to land on the sidebeams he would turn around and fly back to the ground or a perch. but anyway, I guess i will go back to the vendor and ask him where he got his birds. You probably are right that thats not quite domestic behaviour - but i also dont know if this would be a captured bird. What seems possible to me is that it was hand raised in the store and never interacted with, because it was certainly calm in its cage there.
You might also check over your cage for any sharp bits. I once lost a bird to an unknown sharp part of the cage (it was in the grill--I had never found the spot, but my poor baby did.) If there is any sharp piece to the cage, this could be what cut up the wings.
Also, it may be that you are seeing more injuries because of the rough wood. I don't know a lot of people who keep their birds in wooden cages any more--maybe that's why we don't see these sort of injuries.
 
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