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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My question is in regards to wind.

I notice a lot of you have entire walls that are screened / meshed. My 8 x 8 has a large 4 x 6 door that I leave open during the days now that summer is coming (have inner screen door so birds don't get out) plus 2 windows on a side wall. We get some severe winds here that hit the loft head on. (up to 70mph, but mostly 25-40 mph) In the past I always run out and shut the big door & all windows, fearing the "draft" issue. Is that necessary? I think it is best in the 60+ mph winds as there is a lot of dust blowing too, but on the lighter up to say 30mph winds, is it ok to leave the windows open at least?
 

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Ventilation is extreamly important to have for the health of your loft, draft is another matter. Pigeons don't do well in drafty areas so closing your windows is probably a good thing if your loft is catching higher winds. Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know they don't do well in drafts, but what do the people do that have an entire wall opened up during the wind? Wouldn't that be similar to leaving a window open? I know they don't like damp conditions either, but have seen pics on here of birds standing in the snow. It is going to be summer soon, getting in average daily temps of 70 lows/110 highs. If the wind blows and my windows are all closed up, I will end up cooking some birds. Just trying to plan in advance.
 

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I cover my flight cage with plastic and close the windows for the winter months. When the days start to average at least 50, and the nights not below 40, I start to take off some plastic and open the windows. My loft is in full sun, so it gets hot inside during the day if closed up.
I just finished taking off all the plastic and keeping windows open now. But we don't get 70mph winds here in New England (as a rule).
 

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I have the front and sides open on my loft, but it faces southwest and the perches are set behind three walls to keep the birds out of any wind. I am also down in a hole with hills on three sides of me. The side without a hill has my house there to block any strong wind. I have seen a loft open in front but he build a privicy fence eight feet in front of the loft just to block the wind. Both his birds and mine are doing fine. Now that said you live in a more open and colder place. what works for us may not work for you.

Tony
 

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where you live, I would think they would be fine..it is the damp cold wind that chills them that you want to avoid.. not wind in general... mine are out when Im home and flying and sitting in the wind all day...in the summer at least..
 

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I live in the TX panhandle and high winds are a way of life. I use my best judgement with the wind speed. I have two windows on either end of my loft in the direction the wind usually blows. One is 24x36 and set high in the "attic" and the other is 14x48 and lets direct light into the breeder section in the afternoon. I also have 2-24x24s with 36x36 rabbit cages attached for aviaries and bathing. They have a 48x120x84 section that the breeder boxes are in so they get plenty of exericse.
I like to sweep up and dust the loft when the wind is up. It whips the smaller "stuff" right out of the loft.
 

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I have a loft that I know believe to be improperly ventilated . It is a solidly built pre -fab with two windows on the front . What do I need to do for proper ventilation to have air moving without creating a draft ? Isn't a draft and moving air the same thing though , other than closing the loft at night . Would a window fan help ventilate by moving air out the other window or should I have an opening in the back ?
 

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A draft is created only with temp change. If you have a heated loft and a window is left open then that cold air blowing over a bird that is in the heated loft would be a draft. If the temp of your loft is the same as the outside then no draft is created. If it was every time your birds went outside they would be in a draft. The open lofts are fine because there are no drafts created. Wind blowing into a aviary is not a draft.
 

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With only two windows in front that I open and close is not creating proper ventilation is it , also due to the way my property is my loft faces East . If not , what would be a solution to rectify improper ventilation with my set up ?
 

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If The Birds In The Loft Are Breeders Or Not Flying In Competition Dont Worry About It The More Open The Better,a Flying Loft Thats When You Need To Control The Ventilation,birds Bellow The Windows Install Vents Or Open The Hole Bottom,cover It To Make Sure No Rain Guets In The Loft Allso I Built A Wire Mesh Door So I Can Leave The Main Door Open And Guet Ventilation Without Worrying About The Birds Guetting Out Good Luck.
 

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Thank you all for the information . I have a lot to learn and ask a lot of questions . A screen door was definitely on my things to do list . It will give them more sunlight inside the loft . Later own we hope to add a skylight .
 

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Post some 4 side ventilated loft pictures, friends... It will b much easier to understand
 

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Shibu ,
I still wonder if I need to cross ventilate , someone suggested holding a lit cigarette inside the loft and see if the smoke spins or just floats without going out a window . Guess I need to ask my son-in -law to hold one in there and see . With front windows only , someone suggested venting down below the windows , but wouldn't a vent be needed in the back for cross ventilation . Say at the bottom ?


'The greatness of a nation and its moral progress

can be judged by the ways its animals are treated

~ Mahatma Gandhi'
 

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This is my new breeding loft and it is working very well. Its simple just try to make the air flow through the loft from one side to the other and preferably from bottom to top, in the summer hot air rises and will naturally rise to the top.



Check my thread, It will show you some ways to ventilate and there are pic of a air test.

http://www.pigeons.biz/forums/f38/shadybug-lofts-new-loft-43792.html
 

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Nice ! Since you have a ridge vent , the thought came to me to be a whirl fan on top of my loft . Very nice indeed .
 

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I understand ,and agree. My home has a vented roof , given what my loft is , and after I saw yours , I knew exactly what my best option was . Again , you built a really nice loft , wish I possessed those carpentry skills . Thanks for putting the photos up for us !
 

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My homer/tumbler loft does not have vents in the building, but it does have windows on each end. In the summer I leave the windows 1/2 way open (they are covered with 1/2" wire mesh), and the door is always open to the attached flight cage. In the winter I close the windows just leaving a small crack open at the top. The flight cage is covered with plastic, but I leave about 4" open at the top for ventilation.
My fantail loft has peak vents in the building, so when I cover the flight cage in the winter I still leave about 4" open at the top. The doors to the flight cages from the lofts are always open.
I have bamboo pull-up shades on the doors of the flight cages that I draw at night if it's going to be below 30 degrees. And open them during the day. That way, they get just enough ventilation, but no wind going thru in the cold weather. I open everything up in the summer.
 
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