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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have two racing young birds which is my entries for the race this season. They are about 2 months and a week old, and been flying for about 3 weeks. Once they were out for exercise, I noticed that two of my young birds are flying around the loft and when the others start to land and start trapping to eat, the two said young birds are still flying and slowly getting higher and higher then starts to disappear for about 4 to 5 hours. I am sure that they are really hungry before I let them all out.. but when they came back, they surely get in straight inside the loft to eat without staying outside or on the landing board.. Is this normal? Any idea? Thanks!!!
 

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Sounds normal to me. Basically those two young birds have more energy to spend so they still go flying. I suppose these two eat more than others. Some birds do have more stamina or endurance than others. Some are lazy bum. Older pigeons seem to fly less. Younger ones fly more. Sick birds don't fly.

What I find unusual is that they stay for 4-5 hours. My guess is that they don't fly that long. They probably landed somewhere. That would be a bad habit. They may be overfeed so they are not concern returning to your loft. Figure out whether it is a food problem or a bad habit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sounds normal to me. Basically those two young birds have more energy to spend so they still go flying. I suppose these two eat more than others. Some birds do have more stamina or endurance than others. Some are lazy bum. Older pigeons seem to fly less. Younger ones fly more. Sick birds don't fly.

What I find unusual is that they stay for 4-5 hours. My guess is that they don't fly that long. They probably landed somewhere. That would be a bad habit. They may be overfeed so they are not concern returning to your loft. Figure out whether it is a food problem or a bad habit.
Thanks. I'm sure that I let them out before feeding, so what should I do if they probably landed somewhere? Should I feed them once a day or cut their normal feeding? Can this bad habit be changed probably before the short distance training to race proper? When this two young bird fly, they are just routing around the loft and getting higher and higher and farther then suddenly I can't see them anymore.. But when they came back, they go straight inside.. So if it is a food problem or a bad habit, what should I do? Thanks!!!
 

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If they were mine, I would stop loft flyng them for now and start down the road with them. Start at 2 miles, then 5 miles advance to 10 miles. You need to get them out of the habit they are in right now. Dont cut their feed. I feed my bird two times a day.
 

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If these are young birds and just released getting to know their surroundings, then, yes, it is normal for them to land on some roof--I think they call those roof hopping. They, however, must not do it all the time else they will develop bad habit. I just scare them by throwing something in the air (not at them obviously, but just to scare them to fly). You don't need to cut their feed. Just time their hunger. I release my birds an hour earlier before feed time. That way they use their energy flying and after flying, they now feel hungry and will listen to my feed call.

If they are now ranging/tripping (going somewhere), then you can try parrisc tips. The way I see it is that your young birds have lots of energy to burn so they do what they want to do.

Honestly your birds behavior is normal except the 4-5 hours flight thing. My max was 2 hours. Any longer than that, I believe, your birds landed somewhere.

How much are you feeding them anyhow? When my birds don't listen to me it is usually my fault. I either overfed them the day before or I changed my schedule and started feeding their earlier, but they are not yet hungry so they wont listen to me when I call them in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If these are young birds and just released getting to know their surroundings, then, yes, it is normal for them to land on some roof--I think they call those roof hopping. They, however, must not do it all the time else they will develop bad habit. I just scare them by throwing something in the air (not at them obviously, but just to scare them to fly). You don't need to cut their feed. Just time their hunger. I release my birds an hour earlier before feed time. That way they use their energy flying and after flying, they now feel hungry and will listen to my feed call.

If they are now ranging/tripping (going somewhere), then you can try parrisc tips. The way I see it is that your young birds have lots of energy to burn so they do what they want to do.

Honestly your birds behavior is normal except the 4-5 hours flight thing. My max was 2 hours. Any longer than that, I believe, your birds landed somewhere.

How much are you feeding them anyhow? When my birds don't listen to me it is usually my fault. I either overfed them the day before or I changed my schedule and started feeding their earlier, but they are not yet hungry so they wont listen to me when I call them in.
I have something to measure their feed, I don't know exactly the amount of feed, but I'm sure that they are not over fed. It looks like a round spoon. How much do you feed your young birds and breeders? Thanks
 

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I feed my young birds 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) as a base. I add more if they need more, but certainly not more than 2 ounces per bird. My breeders get a minimum of 6 ounces when they are feeding babies or I basically just put the food in the nest box and fill up when it rans out.

Feeding is an art. Some days they want to eat more. Some days they wont. When it is cold they want more. You are the only one that can figure out what your bird needs. I have this bird that wont fly until I feed half a ration. Then it just fly long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I feed my young birds 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) as a base. I add more if they need more, but certainly not more than 2 ounces per bird. My breeders get a minimum of 6 ounces when they are feeding babies or I basically just put the food in the nest box and fill up when it rans out.

Feeding is an art. Some days they want to eat more. Some days they wont. When it is cold they want more. You are the only one that can figure out what your bird needs. I have this bird that wont fly until I feed half a ration. Then it just fly long.
Yes, you're right. I also noticed it in my young birds' loft. When the weather is kinda cold here they eat a lot without leftover, but its been hot here now so they don't eat that much. I also do replenish food for my breeders especially when they are raising their youngsters. By the way, thanks for your input it could help me figure out my feeding program. :)
 

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Your birds are on the right track. Seems those two birds are made for long distances. After your young bird season, keep them around for old bird season next year!
 

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de Vera Loft,

Sound like you've been getting good advice from the site, now you need to decide if and when to start your road training. I usually begin about 6-7 weeks before the first race starts the season.

Ralph
 

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4 or 5 hours? Those youngsters are out having a high old time!
Time to give them something to think about. I would wait till they come back and put them in the box for an hour then let them out IN the loft. Next day repeat, but take them 1 mile away and release them. The next day, 3 miles, the next day, 5 miles, always AFTER they have been flown. Also keep them hungry (NOT starving, hungry), as you increase the distance as they show they are coping with it by homing quickly. If they take an hour to fly 10 miles it is useless sending them 20 miles!
Dont be scared of losing them by training them. If they have not got the brains or instinct to get through early training without getting lost they are not much good, and neither are their parents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
de Vera Loft,

Sound like you've been getting good advice from the site, now you need to decide if and when to start your road training. I usually begin about 6-7 weeks before the first race starts the season.

Ralph
Yes you're right, I'm getting a lot of great advice in this forum.. Our training will be on December and the actual race will be on February 2010.. My Young birds are about 2 1/2 to 4 months now.. So when should I start my road training? What I am doing Now, I'm just letting them out in the afternoon before sundown, so they don't like to fly that much and they easily go in when called to eat in the evening..
 

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I have two racing young birds which is my entries for the race this season. They are about 2 months and a week old, and been flying for about 3 weeks. Once they were out for exercise, I noticed that two of my young birds are flying around the loft and when the others start to land and start trapping to eat, the two said young birds are still flying and slowly getting higher and higher then starts to disappear for about 4 to 5 hours. I am sure that they are really hungry before I let them all out.. but when they came back, they surely get in straight inside the loft to eat without staying outside or on the landing board.. Is this normal? Any idea? Thanks!!!
If...they are actually flying that whole time, that would be very exceptional ! The other year, I to thought I had some very exception "fliers". That was until I went to the store for my wife, and about two blocks from my home, sitting on a shed, were a few of my champion fliers !! :eek:

Here they were enjoying the bird feed some nice old lady had put out for birds, and a nice cool bird bath !! And when they were done eating and drinking, they would sit in the nice cool shade !!

Not saying this is the case with your birds, but if your birds are racing homers, and flying around the blue sky for 4+ hours, then I can say that is not typical. ;)
 
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